Do We Really Need This Kind of Disruption?

In the advertising world these days, there’s a lot of talk about disruption. What the advertisers and designers at some firms are talking about is making things like print ads, TV commercials, and package designs way out of the norm to rattle the consciousness of the American consumer to garner attention faster. Defined as interruption, in advertising disruption translates more to interjection.

The new movement is done at a moderate level in the print arena, much more specifically with tech and Internet magazines, both with placed ads and the overall design of the magazines themselves.

With regard to package designs, it’s done in a watered down way by comparison. Customers in stores are at an average age older than most online buyers, and the designs here cannot be too jumbled or “futuristic” so as to avoid confusing consumers.

But television is an all-encompassing medium, a ready-made stage where anything can happen before you have time to react. You can be watching your favorite telecast and the ads that come across in any given commercial break can not only annoy you, but can actually disturb you.

Such is the case with Subway ads we see while watching the 2018 Winter Olympics on NBC. The ads are pure disruption to be sure: the harsh panorama of visuals dancing on the screen with in-your-face large type (of course all in caps).

This isn’t advertising. And it isn’t good design. It’s yelling. And to make it much worse, accompanying the mind-numbing visuals is the music—or what amounts to music—by a band known as the Country Teasers, a Scottish punk group whose sound can be pure noise.

Not all of their music is terrible. It’s almost always off register, dissonant and discordant, sometimes off-color. Their production values are off the charts, so to speak, and not in a good way. What you hear during these Subway commercials is loud cacophony, filled with rancor that most anyone watching the Olympics wouldn’t pay to hear otherwise. Which makes me wonder about the placement of these ads.

Do Subway customers by and large watch sporting and Olympic events? I’m not sure. Or is it that the airtime was a creampuff that Subway just couldn’t pass up?

The ads were created by Dentsu Aegis Network, a multinational London-based ad agency owned by a Japanese conglomerate. That’s about right these days to be owned by a company in another country. In this case, being based in London might have a lot to do with the choice of (so-called) background music used here.

There are no beauty shots of Subway’s sandwiches, by the way. Nor of their brick-and-mortar franchises. Just the noise you see and hear in these ads, costing Subway a lot of cash.

The series of visuals in the commercials show people doing daring things. But the message Subway is trying to get to you is make your life choices so things will pan out for you. Here, it’s about their sandwich choices (doesn’t ”make it what you want“ sound like a burger company’s tagline ”have it your way”?). In other terms, don’t really do what you see on the screen.

But with the jarring presentation shown, you’d have a tough time convincing viewers of that message.

Please follow and like us:

2 thoughts on “Do We Really Need This Kind of Disruption?

  1. Dan, I’ve seen these Subway ads too. And they sure are disruptive.

    I had the same reaction. Then I stepped back and tried — really tried— to imagine how they hit that 18-34 demographic.

    In other words, I tried like hell not to be accused of Old-Fogeyism.

    To be fair, if you’re into Millennial punk you might be mildly entertained.

    If you’re into Millennial punk AND a Subway customer, this ad might remind you it’s time to hit up your neighborhood store for a foot-long.

    If you’re a Subway customer but not into Millennial punk, you might be a little put off. Or wonder what the hell just happened.

    If you’re into Millennial punk but not a Subway customer, you might connect the two. And, why exactly is a foot-long hip?

    And finally, if you’re not into Millennial punk and not a Subway customer, you might ask: “WHY IS THIS COMMERCIAL SHOUTING AT ME (AND WHY DO I CARE)?”

    Points for disrupting my otherwise enjoyable Olympics evening.

    But Subway ain’t makin’ it to the medals ceremony.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.