Bad Fashion Choices

I’ve written on many areas of design in this blog. To mind, there’s been articles on automotive design, interior design, type design, package design, logo design, all areas of graphic design, motion picture production design, and even design in television commercials.

But I’ve not yet written about fashion design. This entry will not be specifically about design among fashionable garments as much as it is about bad design choices.

There’s bad design choices in any area of design. And those bad choices can and are done by the designers themselves. You see it all the time.

In fashions, just go to stores like Ann Klein and Brooks Brothers to see the better designs, and then go to places like TJMaxx and JCPenney to see the bad ones. A discerning eye doesn’t take long to notice the difference.

But bad design choices are done most of the time by customers wearing the wrong items and it does not matter where they bought them. Dollars do not translate to good design choices.

Men usually don’t show bad design choices they’ve made because, for the most part, men wear standard items of clothing for each area of dress. For formal dress, men will wear a tailored suit or tuxedo, and those items either fit or they don’t (I’ve seen Tim Gunn wearing ill-fitting sports jackets, which makes me wonder).

Unfortunately for women, however, bad choices can show all the more. Because women have the luxury of a wide variety of choices to wear for such occasions, and make personal choices based on ego, the door is wide open for criticism. That’s why we have these red carpet displays at huge galas in show business which show, hopefully, the better decisions among fashion choices.

Far and away, gowns for these occasions are designed specifically for these stars. And the trend for Hollywood is the deep plunging neckline. Unfortunately, not every woman should be wearing that type of garment, regardless of who she is. A plunging neckline is a revealing feature, and what it should reveal is one thing, but a lot of these stars have nothing to reveal, and showing a bony chest instantly becomes a very bad design choice.

Some years ago while I was working at an ad agency, I noticed a girl who was overweight by perhaps one hundred pounds. You couldn’t miss her. She wasn’t obvious by her voice or her manner, but the fact that she chose to wear miniskirts made most of the rest of us a little uncomfortable.

How do you let that person know she made a bad design choice?

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