Home Grown Advertising

I was driving down the highway the other day, right behind a semi that I thought was a local mover. Turns out this is indeed a “local” company, based in White Plains, NY and doing business throughout Westchester County. But since I live in Florida, someone hired this “local” concern to move them here.

I hadn’t seen Al’s Moving before. And I had a hard time reading the logo on the back of that truck. You see it above, with “Al’s” tucked behind three-dimensional letterforms—spelling out “MOVING”—being carried by small figures. How quaint.

Seems Al’s has been in business since 1948 (I get that) and has been a good trusted mover according to their reviews. And that’s a good thing, because they need that kind of reputation. Because the logo doesn’t do them any justice. This kind of imagery can only be conceived by either a family member or friend of the owner, done probably back in good ol’ 1948. Obviously before the world knew the difference between designing a logo and fleshing out a semi-cartoon to promote a serious business. What I like to call “home grown advertising”.

By contrast, there’s also a moving company known as Two Men and a Truck, another well-respected mover. But their logo (not shown) is a simple stick-figure-based drawing done tongue-in-cheek to make the company look primitive and small-time. But that’s part of their charm. Here, Al’s Moving is still trying too hard with those terribly spaced letterforms, which are too difficult to read anyway.

Why do companies do this? Certainly someone must’ve told Al or maybe Al’s son (and probably Al’s grandson—it is a family-owned business) that times change, that the comic-strip-like image is at least no longer relevant. Could they hire a designer to make a much better logo? Sure. But would they ruin it? I mean, they probably toast this ugly image in a local bar.

So much for bad logos (this week, anyway). Now we’ll jump on My Pillow, everyone’s TV favorite. We’re not going to bash his logo—it’s actually not terrible. The font chosen for this has forms that are somewhat folksy, with thick and thin puffy contours, not totally unlike Mike Lindell’s pillow. So this logo is OK for the informal nature of this product.

No, what I’m keying in on is the tune sung by a trio of women at the end of his commercial (for copyright reasons, I couldn’t attach a link in this column). If you haven’t heard it, you will sometime soon, I’m sure. And when you do, you’ll probably cringe and wince a lot. Because it actually sounds like the recording was made back in good ol’ 1948. How quaint.

Gee, Mike, is that Mom singing with her neighbors? I’m certain Mike Lindell has made enough money by now that he can drop the radio-days song—which must’ve cost $50—and slip his TV ad into the 21st century.

It’s OK—I guess—to do your own TV ad. But that’s what car dealers do. They have to, because their margins are thin. But Mr. Lindell is trying too hard, with his hard-sell approach. I get it, it is after all his pillow.

All companies started local and were small once. Most learned to get current over time, the larger and more successful they became, and let go of that homey image. But obviously some just can’t.

Is it tradition or is it just stubbornness?

 

 

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